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Occupational therapy department gets patients back to everyday life

[caption id="attachment_6548" align="alignleft" width="747"] In honor of Occupational Therapist Month, we’re celebrating our community’s occupational therapists Celice Stancil, left, and Tyler Stoddard.[/caption]

April is Occupational Therapist Month, which provides the perfect opportunity to shine a spotlight on our Salina Presbyterian Manor’s occupational therapists. Celice Stancil is our occupational therapy director, and Tyler Stoddard is our occupational therapist.

Occupational therapy focuses on helping patients recover from an illness or injury, and get them back to doing the tasks involved in everyday life.

“We concentrate on dressing, toileting, bathing—the kinds of things people do every day,” said Celice. “Our goal is to alleviate pain and get our patients back to being 100 percent functional.”

Beyond the treatments and activities Celice and Tyler administer on campus, they also take patients into the community where they can practice their skills in a real-world setting.

“We take patients shopping or to the grocery store,” said Celice. “For people who like shopping as much as I do, we take them to places like Target, where they work on their overall functionality.”

Those trips are not all about work. There also is quite a bit of fun.

“It’s hilarious sometimes the amount of stuff we can knock over when we’re doing something like trying to learn how to drive a scooter,” said Celice.

Occupational therapy was not always Celice’s intended career path.

Originally a nursing student, she was introduced to occupational therapy by her husband, Erik, who already was in the field. Celice fell in love with the ability of occupational therapy to make a real difference in the lives of others.

“What I enjoy most about occupational therapy is being able to identify a patient’s problem, solve it and get them back to functioning the way they did before the problem arose,” said Celice. “That makes my heart happy.”

Tyler said he finds the same joy in his work.

“Interacting with residents is my favorite thing on a day-to-day basis,” said Tyler. “I like the results. It is satisfying when a person comes to us who is weak and needs help by two people to stand, and then they go through the whole therapy process, and by the end they are walking on their own and doing things unassisted.”

This spring marks Celice’s fifth year at Presbyterian Manor, and Tyler has been here one year.

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