Everything listed under: Aging Well

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    Do you have plan for emergencies?

    Taking the time to organize your important papers and records may be the best investment you ever make for your loved ones. Planning ahead at any age can save time, stress and money if an emergency or death should occur.Join us as Debra Wood, district extension agent in family resource management for the Central Kansas Extension District, shares ideas and tips for getting your papers in order at "Do You Have a Plan in Place?" a free Just Ask event at Salina Presbyterian Manor at noon J...  Read More...

  • Mary’s Musings: Caring Conversations

    By Mary Bridges, chaplainThe seasons of our lives are many and varied. Some are familiar and filled with joy and growth. Some feel cold, barren and filled with overwhelming uncertainty.   Read More...

  • Intergenerational art class about more than art

    Every other month, the young and the young at heart come together within the community to collaborate in the name of art. Side-by-side—and often together—the budding artists work on projects ranging from acrylic paintings to holiday ornaments, but often the finished product is little more than an afterthought.“This class gives me some time to spend with my granddaughter. They grow up so fast that sometimes you just don’t get to spend any time with them,” said reside...  Read More...

  • Ruth Drown remains dedicated fixture in community

    For most people, retirement means slowing down, kicking back and enjoying a well-deserved break from the day-to-day grind.Not for Ruth Drown.Ruth, who retired from the community in 2014, where she served has a dietary aide, cook and dishwasher, has become a regular volunteer in the community’s kitchen and dining room.Whether she’s folding napkins or helping to set the tables for dinner, it seems she’s always nearby and ready to lend a hand.“Whenever I can help somebody, I...  Read More...

  • 5 lessons from the oldest old

    Photo cedit: Adobe Stock[/caption]By Robert DiGiacomoNew York Times reporter John Leland thought he knew how to write about the “oldest old” — people 85 and up. For a proposed year-long series, he figured he would chronicle a laundry list of their issues: things like the dangers of falling, financial pressures and family conflict.As Leland delved deeper, however, he realized the people in this age group were more than the sum of their problems. And he saw how much he didn&...  Read More...